divisive diversity

What would you say to a skeptic of workplace diversity?

 

developed with

Eleanor Chestnut, PhD.

platform

Mobile VR

released

March 2018

 

Based on the Google memo controversy of August 2017, this simulation positions players as team leaders within Google in the week after the memo gains visibility publicly. Players first learn about the academic research behind gender and current approaches to increasing workplace diversity. They then speak with three subordinate team members, each of whom conveys a commonly held belief about the trade-offs of diversity policies.

 
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"I’ve been a hiring manager here and the applicant pool is not even close to even. I’m all for better recruiting of women -- like, wording our job listings in ways that appeal to both genders. But simply asking to 'hire more women' just leads to compromises on quality, which then feeds the perception that women are actually worse engineers, and then here we are. What if there aren’t enough qualified women?"

Question posed by Tanvi, your direct report and a senior member of your team.

 

what you'll learn

Through answering the questions of their virtual team members, and receiving peer feedback on those responses, players gain a deeper understanding of the complexities involved in successfully implementing a diversity strategy as well as tactically how to create an inclusive environment by example.

keywords

  • First-line management
  • Diversity and inclusion
  • Stereotyping
  • Unconscious bias

About Eleanor Chestnut

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Eleanor Chestnut completed her B.A. in Linguistics and Cognitive Science at Pomona College, and her Ph.D. in Psychology at Stanford University.  She is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at New York University, where she is exploring the relations among language, conceptual development, and social stereotyping.  Her work focuses in particular on subtle aspects of language that might undermine efforts to promote gender equality.  She has published in several top-tier psychological journals, and her research has been cited by NPR.